Outsourced (2006)

Josh Hamilton, Ayesha Dharker, Asif Basra, Matt Smith,
After his entire department is outsourced, an American novelty products salesman (Hamilton) heads to India to train his replacement.
  • 7.0 /10.0 IMDB Rating:
  • DatePublished:
  • 2018-09-07 Added:
  • George Wing, Writer:
  • John Jeffcoat, Director:
  • Tom Gorai, Producer:

Trailer:

7 / 10

delicate story bursting with affection for India

One of the many productions dealing with the offshoring of American jobs, but narrated with class and delicacy, with no clichés. There's plenty of culture shock, due to new food, busted infrastructures, and other cultural barriers but with a pace never seen before, in my opinion. It's funny but becomes a romance as well and has one of its best moments when the two leading actors imitate the stereotype of the other, with impressive results. Almost entirely shot in India, Outsourced is a truly tiny movie that ultimately says a lot about troubles crossing cultural divisions. Among many films handling the subject this is one of the best.

9 / 10

Terrific

I went into this film thinking I would see a "nice" film that "deserved to be seen" (which is too often code for a boring movie). I laughed my ass off, as did the whole audience. This is the most entertaining movie I've seen in months -- time and again the filmmakers found a way to surprise me. A tight story. Terrific performances from the stars all the way down to the tiniest roles. Perfect pacing. Graceful, muscular directing. This is not a "good little movie" -- it's a good movie, period and it's a crime it's not getting wider distribution just because the male lead isn't played by the flavor of the month. A smart, funny film.

10 / 10

Delightful and kind of educational as well

One of the happiest surprises of this year's Toronto International Film Festival was this delightful, beautifully shot comedy, which is not only funny and touching but actually offers a few insights into Indian culture as well. Josh Hamilton is terrific as Todd, an American businessman who is less than thrilled to learn his Seattle office is going to outsource its work to a call center in India. He's even more perturbed when his boss makes it clear that Todd will be in charge of training the Indian workers to efficiently handle orders while sounding as American as possible; that's important since the firm markets all-American knickknacks, such as miniature flags, hot dog toasters and Wisconsin cheese hats. The culture clash that results is beautifully played and wonderfully written. This has the potential to be another MY BIG FAT Greek WEDDING, if it's handled properly. I hope it is. I've been a big fan of Hamilton for years and he deserves a big hit.

7 / 10

Like going to India for 90 minutes

The sweetest movie I've seen all year, full of funny cultural misunderstandings and whiffs of the foreigner experience. Amazing performances by Indian actors, especially a certain "Auntie G" who is the "Hyacinth Bouquet"/"Hostess with the Mostess" of Bombay. The fellow who plays Puri charms as consummate straight man to cross-cultural business humor. Loved that the company's products are American patriotic crapola, and that they still mean something to the striving foreign vendors. Much poetic poignancy between the laughs in this film. Josh Hamilton's character's evolution is believable and rewarding, reflecting a journey many more Americans need to take. Don't miss this trip!

8 / 10

From the heart.

I had an absolute blast watching this movie today. It was funny, moving and most of all, sincere. It would have been very easy for the filmmakers to fall back into stereotypes while writing and shooting this movie, but they skillfully steered clear of any pitfalls that plague so many other movies out there, especially in this genre.

I got the chance to see this movie at a special screening at UW in Seattle today and join in a Q&A session with the writers (and director) John and George, Ayesha, who plays Asha, and a few of the producers. John, the director and co-writer, mentioned he had spent quite some time in Nepal and India during his student years. And although the story itself is a fictional one, the cultural shocks and experiences Todd goes through were largely based on John's own experiences during his time abroad. This seems to make for a very honest take on the nuances of this story. Luckily the movie not only focuses on Todd's shock of arriving in a completely new culture. The local people that Todd deals with on a daily basis also find they need to adjust to Todd's American way of running a call center. This makes for a balanced telling of a story about cultural differences and, maybe more importantly, the similarities.

It may not be a groundbreaking movie by any blockbuster standards, but the sincerity seems to be coming straight from the heart. And that's something you rarely see in movies nowadays. This movie deserves all the attention it gets. So go see it! And if you like it, tell your friends.