Larry (\N)

Azhy Robertson,
Come Play is a movie starring Azhy Robertson, Gillian Jacobs, and John Gallagher Jr.. A monster named Larry manifests itself through smart phones and mobile devices. Feature film version of the 2017 short film.
  • 5.8 /10.0 IMDB Rating:
  • DatePublished:
  • 2018-09-07 Added:
  • Writer:
  • Jacob Chase, Director:
  • Alex Heineman, Andrew Rona, Producer:

Trailer:

7 / 10

Something different, good movie

I think this was a good horror movie, which had something new in it that kept it interesting. The general presentation was very good.

The pacing is a slow burn with more and more weird stuff happening as it goes on, which I liked a lot. Being someone who hates jump scares I was glad this one didn't really have any. The horror aspect was well done but some might find it mild maybe, and it was scary.

I like that there seems to be an allegory happening in the background of technology causing people to become more isolated and lonely; which of course is sad but true. The demon could be interpreted as a representation of loneliness perhaps as you get older.

I'm not sure why this one was lower on the ratings, but I think it is underrated and I enjoyed it.

7/10 a good novel horror.

8 / 10

While it appears on the surface as just another cliché cash grab horror film aimed at teens/kids, Come Play actually has a deeper emotional core with some solid scares.

While we all want something terrifying from the horror films we watch, it is nice to get some psychological and emotional aspects intertwined within the scares to give it that extra depth. This particular story is very reminiscent to Mike Flanagan's style where he places just as much importance into the heart and soul of the characters as the amount of detail in the creepy creatures or hauntings. It's definitely a great and promising first feature effort from Jacob Chase.

The film still does have its classic clichés with many predictable timed jump scares and the all too common tech themes of late , but it still wraps everything together nicely with some interesting concepts. There are some tremendous moments of authentic emotion portrayed by the main actors as well which is an underrated aspect especially in horror films. There's also a very interesting entity with a great backstory with some decent enough CGI to present it. The atmosphere and tension is prevalent and there are some clever camera choices.

Overall it's way better than many will think it will be after seeing the very cliche trailer, and people shouldn't take it for just a kids horror. If this is the one wide release horror film we get for Halloween, it does serve its purpose well enough.

8 / 10

Very entertaining horror!

The movie is a good way to spend the evening, acting is decent, love all young talent, storyline is entertaining, I like the fact that parents believed and jumped on the train of fighting this monster quite early in the movie!

The movie is heavily inspired by Stranger Things, but way scarier version that's for sure.

7 / 10

Jacob Chase delivers one of the biggest surprises of 2020 with Come Play!

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2020 is undoubtedly one of the worst years ever for movies, not even in terms of quality, but the infinite delays of highly anticipated films automatically make this year more underwhelming than what it would ever be. Nevertheless, it still delivered a few surprises along the way. Movies that I wasn't really expecting to like as much as I did (Underwater, The Call of the Wild), or even films that I knew I'd enjoy them but eventually end up absolutely loving them (The One and Only Ivan, Palm Springs, The Personal History of David Copperfield). Jacob Chase's feature directorial debut is amongst the former group. I only knew the premise and the cast, which I have to admit didn't really convince me, but I still gave it a go since this could be my last trip to a film theater this year...

If it ends up truly being my last time watching a movie on the big screen this year, then it's a wonderful final film. Come Play is one of the biggest surprises of 2020. There are so many aspects that I absolutely love about it, but it doesn't escape from several issues as well. I'll start with the impressive performance of Azhy Robertson (Oliver) as a non-verbal autistic kid. As someone who has shared some time with a young autistic girl, I left the theater fully believing that Azhy was, in fact, autistic in real-life (I didn't recognize him from Marriage Story). I was mind-blown when I found out he wasn't. His display feels so realistic and authentic that I never thought his portrayal was pure acting.

John Gallagher Jr. (Marty) is really good as well, but he doesn't have as much screentime as Gillian Jacobs (Sarah). The latter isn't exactly awful, but she definitely disappoints in the more sentimental moments. She's great during the horror sequences, adding to the suspenseful atmosphere, but when the time comes to really deliver heartfelt dialogues and passionate expressions, Gillian fails to offer a convincing performance. The other kids in the movie are also quite cringe-worthy, but not every young actor can be incredible at such a young age.

Despite the cast's irregular interpretations, none ruins the captivating story behind Larry, the "misunderstood monster" on the other side of the screen. The social commentary is loud and clear, giving the film a whole other layer. Jacob Chase's commitment and dedication to this work (based on his own short) are palpable throughout the runtime, visible through the numerous tiny details spread across each storyline. I found myself astonishingly invested in the narrative. However, Chase often repeats scenes meant to pass that social message he so desperately wants to transmit, transforming many scenes that could be genuine into something extremely forced.

This last aspect is compensated with innovative horror sequences with highly creative use of today's technology to generate an incredibly tense environment. There aren't many jumpscares, but most are pretty effective. Nevertheless, it's the suspenseful atmosphere throughout the entire movie that elevates the overall horror vibe. Chase also employs long takes, which ultimately leaves viewers at the edge of their seats due to some excellent camera work (Maxime Alexandre) and seamless editing (Gregory Plotkin). I really like the score (Roque Ba?os), but there are a couple of moments where the almost silent music weirdly becomes an adventure tune.

Another brilliant technical decision comes from Chase's work with the VFX team. As expected from a low-budget production, the visual effects would never reach today's standards if they decided to show the monster in plain sight during daylight. If you go into the film expecting a monster movie where the latter is the protagonist, forget it. The crew was intelligent and humble enough to acknowledge the not-that-good VFX quality, so Chase "hides" the monster with low lighting and "shows" him during night sequences and/or through a smartphone/tablet's camera. It might be a disappointing aspect for many people, but I was delighted with this smart decision.

It's more of a family drama than a generic horror flick. There's a fair attempt at delivering something special, and I do believe it was very close to being one of the best films of the year. The treatment of the autistic character is near-perfect. I love the fact that not only the movie shows every problem that a condition like this brings, but it also demonstrates the extraordinary qualities that autistic people possess. Even though he cannot speak, Oliver is exceptionally clever, fun, and brave, something I believe most of today's society doesn't think autistic kids can be. The ending is both bold and surprising, finishing on a significant emotional moment that will leave viewers with a bittersweet reaction.

In the end, Come Play is one of my favorite surprises of this year. Jacob Chase proves that he's a dedicated filmmaker who knows his craft. With exceptional preparation, Chase presents an extremely captivating narrative, distinct from the generic horror flicks that flood every year. By focusing on the emotionally compelling story instead of the formulaic jumpscares, the horror sequences have a much more significant impact due to the viewer's connection with the main characters, especially Azhy Robertson's. The latter delivers one of the best young performances of 2020, interpreting an autistic kid with remarkable authenticity. However, the rest of the cast is not up to the task, especially Gillian Jacobs, who disappoints with an overall emotionally underwhelming display. The social commentary is important and efficiently transmitted, despite Chase eventually losing his balance and exaggerating the number of scenes that ultimately become forced. Technically, the suspenseful atmosphere steals the spotlight from the few yet effective jumpscares. Ends with a surprisingly bold, emotionally bittersweet moment. As long as you don't expect a "monster flick" packed with predictable scares, I sincerely recommend it to anyone looking for a Halloween plan.

Rating: B+

6 / 10

Just watch it (5 maybe 6 out of 10)

No, it's not a masterpiece that would deserve 10/10 as some have rated it here. But it's not a total crap either so it doesn't deserve 1/10 ratings either.The story as a whole is actually good, something different. There are few jumps scares, some better than others, there's some creepiness at times. It's supposed to be a horror movie but at times it felt more as fantasy - I think that might be one of the reasons why this movie is rather weak, the director couldn't make up his mind what genre to choose.The main actors, unfortunately, are terrible. The few ones that are actually ok play only secondary roles. The parents are annoying, you actually hope that at least one of them would die - they're so unlikable (I won't say if anyone dies or not because I don't want to give spoilers). Some the dialogues would make your eyes roll as well. I don't know what went wrong, the movie had so much potential to be so much better. I thought it might have been the budget but for 9mil (to compare: Babadook had only 2mil) I would expect something better.In short: it's an "ok" movie. Definitely something different. The 5.9 score it has at the moment is fair.