Just Mercy (2020)

Brie Larson, Michael B. Jordan, Jamie Foxx, Alfre Woodard,
Just Mercy is a movie starring Jamie Foxx, Charlie Pye Jr., and Michael Harding. World-renowned civil rights defense attorney Bryan Stevenson works to free a wrongly condemned death row prisoner.
  • 7.6 /10.0 IMDB Rating:
  • DatePublished:
  • 2018-09-07 Added:
  • Andrew Lanham, Bryan Stevenson, Writer:
  • Destin Daniel Cretton, Director:
  • Asher Goldstein, Gil Netter, Producer:

Trailer:

10 / 10

Take some of the very negative scores with a grain of salt....the film is amazing.

I saw "Just Mercy" a few days ago at the Philadelphia Film Festival and was blown away by the film....and I consider it to be one of the best movies I've seen in recent years. I could easily see the picture receiving several Oscar nominations---especially for acting. Imagine my suprise when I looked on IMDB and saw a score of 5.6 and some negative reviews! I am not exactly sure what this is all about and perhaps it's because there are some angry pro-capital punishment folks or some who simply hate a film with a mostly black cast. All I know is that the film is a quality production and kept my interest throughout.

The story is based on the work of Bryan Stevenson, a Harvard graduate who chose to move to Alabama and work for a small salary to help examine the convictions of men on death row...men who in some cases were not guilty at all. How could anyone NOT applaud this sort of thing?!

Overall, a brilliantly written film that made me sad and angry....and I love when a film effects me that way. The acting was top-notch, the story magnificent and the writing amazing. Just ignore all the negativity and see this one....you'll be happy you did. As for me, I'd consider this perhaps the best American film of the decade...it's THAT good.

9 / 10

Just Mercy - Corrupt and unequal justice system to the poor and minorities

Intense courtroom drama based on actual events and based on the book by the same name, about a trainee lawyer who moves to Alabama to devote his career to defending the unfortunate community, the people who were not able to afforded appropriate defence (these were mostly black).

His first case was that of Walter McMillian, who was sentenced to death for the murder of a white woman. However, all the evidence showed that he was innocent, and it was more suspicious that the only testimony against him came from another criminal who was also on death row.

This film shows how corrupt the justice system can be, the poor and minorities are too often not treated equally. The post credit scenes tell you what happened to each of the people featured.

Highly recommended.

10 / 10

Phenomenal

Fantastic movie from beginning to end.A story that needed to be told, and one that I am grateful to have been shown.This story is a tragedy of mis-justice with hopes of redemption throughout, a real roller coaster, I shed tears more than once.I would highly recommend this movie to be watch by anyone, I will be dwelling on this for quite some time, I'm now off to Google to read up on the real life character on which this movie is based, I have no doubt that afterwards you will be doing it too.Lastly I will add that I believe the current rating of this movie thus far is ridiculously low, I truly believe this is a story worthy of more than a 9, let alone its current 7.3.

5 / 10

Read the book: the movie does not do justice to how deeply awful the true story is.

I came away disappointed by the film adaptation of Just Mercy. This is probably a given, but the film adaptation is very overly-dramatized, and not completely true to the story. While this is expected, I find it in this case to be in somewhat poor taste considering everything is a portrayal of real-life people and real-life events.

Having read the book, you would see that the racism that actually took place was seriously watered down for the film adaptation. The film also touches on things from the book briefly but not enough to give you the entire picture or depth of the situation. For example, the film also briefly follows Herb, who is being executed for murdering a girl. While the film touches on his PTSD and having been a veteran, and "making a bomb", the film doesn't explain, like the book did, that it was illegal for the state of Alabama to execute Herb because he had no intention of killing anyone (he made the bomb as part of a convoluted plan to "rescue" his old girlfriend and win her back, but instead the bomb killed her young daughter). The state of Alabama executed him anyway after Stevenson's last minute appeal because it was "too late".

In the movie, Herb also has "no family" and gives his flag to Stevenson. In real life, he was surrounded by family, including a new partner who refused to give him up when he had to be taken away to be executed (by the way, his execution in the film is just a simple "thud").

I also found Jamie Foxx's portrayal of Walter McMillian to be wildly inaccurate. In the movie, he blows up upon first meeting Stevenson, and comes off as someone who is nonchalant about life at Holman Correctional Facility and knows everything about the decorum there. He even refuses Stevenson's services at first. In real life, Walter was traumatized by the conditions at Holman and during his case was desperately seeking Stevenson's attention over that of his fellow inmates.

There are several critiques I have for the film, but I don't want to spoil the central story. I strongly recommend you read the book instead, because you will walk away from it with a much more thorough understanding of our criminal justice system and what's really going on in America.

8 / 10

An Important Story in American History

Jamie Foxx gives another stellar performance along with two solid performances by Michael B. Jordan & Brie Larson. I found this movie to be deeply riveting from start to finish. This is a story of how a corrupt & deeply flawed legal system can destroy innocent lives & what institutional Racism from top to bottom really looks like. You cannot fail to be moved by this story and what these great actors deliver.